Program for the Conference on Hygiene, Medicine, and Well-Being

Program for the 2015 Symposium on “Hygiene, Medicine, and Well-Being in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Age”

 

University of Arizona, Tucson, April 30 – May 2, 2015

Organized by Albrecht Classen, Dept. of German Studies

 

Locations: César Chavez Building room 111 on campus, University of Arizona.

 

 

Registration: $90 for the active participants (includes all evening receptions, all meals and refreshments, and the publication of the selected, expanded, and revised papers in our book series “Fundamentals of Medieval and Early Modern Culture”

with Walter de Gruyter in Berlin, Germany)

 

 

THURSDAY, April 30, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. RECEPTION (Hosted by UA), Riverpark Inn, 350 S. Freeway, next to Interstate 10, south of St. Mary’s Rd. (hospitality suite 134 on the west side of the hotel,) – we hope to see you, so feel free to drop in and to stay until ca. 9 p.m., but the room will be a suite where two of the participants are staying, so we should not impose ourselves for too long after 9 p.m., except for Saturday when we’ll have our roundtable!

 

FRIDAY, May 1, 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m.: César Chavez Building, 110 E North Campus Drive http://map.arizona.edu)

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE: Each Speaker will have twenty-five minutes for the talk, and ten minutes for discussions, but not more than thirty-five minutes in total.

 

Friday: Meet in the hotel lobby at 8:20 a.m. Please be punctual. I will purchase the day passes for you (another item for both days covered by the registration)

 

8:30 a.m. departure with the modern streetcar (http://www.sunlinkstreetcar.com/index.php?pg=8)

 

We’ll ride to the campus of The University of Arizona and get off at the Sunlink station 2nd Street and Olive Street. and walk down to the central campus.This will take about 30 minutes.

 

Chair for both days: Albrecht Classen

 

 

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION: 9:15 a.m.– 9:25 a.m. Albrecht Classen

(University of Arizona):

 

REGISTRATION: 9:00-9:25 A.M. (Gennady Sare, Business Manager, COH)

 

9:25 a.m.-10:00 a.m.: Daniel F. Pigg (Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages, The University of Tennessee at Martin, TN 38238): Bald’s Leechbook and the Construction of Male Health in Anglo-Saxon England

 

10:00 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.: Belle Tuten, Juniata College, Huntington, PA, History: The Necessitas Naturae and Monastic Hygiene

10:35 a.m. – 11:10 a.m. Erin S. Lynch, Western Michigan University: Circumdederunt Me; Libera Me: Spatial Barrier as Hygiene for the Medieval Lepers of Grand-Beaulieu

 

11:10 a.m.-11:30 a.m.: Coffee/Tea Break: Hosted by UA

 

11:30 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.: Debra L. Stoudt, Virginia Tech: Elemental Healing in the Middle Ages

 

12:05 p.m. -1:15 p.m. Lunch.  Hosted by UA, at Chavez Building

 

1:15 p.m. - 1:50 p.m. Scott Taylor, Pima Community College: Si Odore Solo Locus Pestilentiosus Fiat: Private Property, Public Health and Environmental Hygiene – Advantages of the English Common Law of Nuisance
over the Corpus Juris Civilis”

 

2:00 p.m. -2:35 p.m.: Cynthia White, Department of Classics, The University of Arizona
Potiones ad sanandum: Text as Remedy in a Medieval Bestiary

 

2:35 p.m. -3:10 p.m.: Rosa A. Perez, Southern Utah University: “Troubled Waters:  Bathing and Illicit Relations in Flamenca and Equitan

 

3:10 p.m. -3:35 p.m.  Coffee Break: Hosted by UA

 

3:35 p.m. - 4:10 p.m.: Jean E. Jost (Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625): The Ambiguous Effects of Water and Oil in Middle English Romance: Acknowledged and Ignored

 

4:10 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.: Anne Scott, (English Dept. and Honors Program, NAU, Flagstaff): Water as Litmus Test and Lodestone: Emotional Experience in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

 

4:45 p.m.  - 5:20 p.m.: Penny C. Simons (Sheffield University, UK): The Good Life?  Hygiene and Well-Being in Old French texts

 

5:20 p.m. -6:15 p.m.: Tour of the campus

 

6:15 p.m.: Dinner at Sinbad’s Restaurant (Middle Eastern), 810 East University Blvd.: Hosted by UA (including soft drinks, juice, water, but alcoholic drinks on your own)

 

7:30 p.m.: Return to the Riverpark Inn with the Streetcar, get off at Cushing and Frontage Road, immediately west of the Interstate 10

 

Reception: Riverpark Inn, Hospitality Suit 134: 8:00 - 9:45 p.m. Hosted by UA

 

 

SATURDAY, May 2:

 

8:20 a.m. Departure from the hotel (please be punctual). We’ll take the Sunlink Streetcar again to the Campus, which takes about 30 minutes. There is only one Streetcar, so no confusion possible.

 

To reach our conference site in César Chavez Building 111, we’ll get off the Streetcar at 2nd Street and Olive Street and walk down (south).

 

9:30 a.m.-10:05 a.m.: Warren Tormey, English Department, Middle Tennessee State University: Treating the Condition of “Evil” in the Anglo-Saxon Herbals

 

10:05 a.m.-10:40 a.m.: David Tomiček (John Evangelista Purkyne University, Czech Republic): Air as the Subject of Hygienic Rules in Medieval Medical Literature

 

10:40 a.m.-11:05 a.m. Coffee/Tea Break

 

11:05 a.m.-11:40 a.m.: Albrecht Classen, University of Arizona: The ‘Dirty Middle Ages’: Bathing and Cleanliness in Medieval German Courtly Romances: Another Myth Buster

 

11:40 a.m.-12:15: Sarah Gordon, Dept. of French, Utah State University: Mens Sana in Corpore Sanus: Wellness and Cleanliness in Two Fifteenth-Century Medical Manuals

 

12:15 p.m.-1:30 p.m.: Lunch (Hosted by UA); Paradise Bakery Restaurant, 845 N. Park, #125 (we'll walk over there and back)

1:30-1:45: walking back to Chavez

1:45 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.: Christina Welch, University of Winchester: Understanding Spiritual Well-being in Late-Medieval England through Sculptures of the Emaciated Dead

 

2:20 p.m. -2:55 p.m.: Chiara Benati, Dipartimento di Lingue e Culture Moderne, Università degli Studi di Genova: The field surgery manual which became a medical common place book: Hans von Gersdorff’s Feldtbuch der Wundarzney translated into Low German

 

2:55 p.m.-3:15 p.m.: Coffee/Tea Break

 

3:15 p.m.-3:50 p.m.: Thomas G. Benedek, University of Pittsburgh:The Scientific Logic of Therapeutic Bathing in the 16th Century

 

3:50 p.m.-4:25 p.m.: Thomas Willard (The University of Arizona): The Water in the Rose Garden: Miraculous Properties of Water in Early Modern Chemistry

 

 

4:25 p.m.-5:00 p.m.: Allison P. Coudert, University of California at Davis: “The Mouse’s Petition”: Extending the Boundaries of Well-Being in the Long Eighteenth Century

 

5:00 p.m.: Transport to downtown restaurant with the Streetcar (at Olive and 2nd Street)

 

 

5:45 p.m.: Dinner at Miss Saigon (Vietnamese), downtown, 47 N. 6th Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85701, (520) 884-4778 (west of Ronstadt Bus Terminal, intersection with Congress Street

 

7:15 p.m.: Transportation back to the Hotel with Sunlink (station at Congress and 6th Ave., get off the streetcar at Cushing and Frontage Road, which is right next to the hotel after the Interstate 10)

 

7:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. Reception, Riverpark Inn, Hospitality Suite 134. Hosted by UA

 

8:30 p.m.: Roundtable Discussion: What have we achieved? Where do we go from here?

 

Preparation for publication in “Fundamentals of Medieval and Early Modern Culture”

 

Sunday, May 3

On your own:

Excursion to the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (http://www.desertmuseum.org/about/):

$19.50 entrance fee on your own, senior discount: $17.50.

Unfortunately, the hotel cannot take you there, as in the past, because they will use the van to take guests to the airport. But there are taxis.

 

For others (max 3 in my car), I would like to offer a short (free) excursion to the historical mission church San Xavier del Bac (ca. 1790). Pick-up at ca. 8:30 a.m., return to the hotel at ca. 10 a.m.

 

We could plan on a dinner in a superb Mexican restaurant downtown, Taco Giro, 610 N. Grande Ave., near the hotel at 6 p.m. for those who will stay until Monday or longer.

 

We wish to acknowledge the generous support of the following sponsors: The UA Departments of German Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, English, French and Italian, University of Arizona Committee of Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Studies (UAMARRC), and the Dean of the College of Humanities.