Class schedule

CLASS SCHEDULE (dates for exams and papers are tentative, and if a change of dates will be necessary, it will be announced in class and on the listserv). The suggested readings, all available in the library, are not required but can provide you with additional viewpoints and information. They are not necessary for the quizzes or for the papers, but can prove to be highly useful and hence are recommended for the inquisitive mind. You also can find a vast amount of very useful information on my homepage (see above).  For more specialized research, consult the SABIO website (Library Catalogue:https://www.library.arizona.edu).

See also D2L for announcements, news, and answers to frequently raised questions.

Specific assignments: always come to class having read those specific texts or pages assigned for that day! When only a text's title is mentioned, calculate on your own how much you must have read to follow the class discussion for that day.

CLASS SCHEDULE (dates for exams and papers are tentative, and if a change of dates will be necessary, it will be announced in class and on the listserv). The suggested readings, all available in the library, are not required but can provide you with additional viewpoints and information. They are not necessary for the quizzes or for the papers, but can prove to be highly useful and hence are recommended for the inquisitive mind. You also can find a vast amount of very useful information on my homepage (see above).  For more specialized research, consult the SABIO website (Library Catalogue:http://www.library.arizona.edu).

See also D2L for announcements, news, and answers to frequently raised questions.

Specific assignments: always come to class having read those specific texts or pages assigned for that day! When only a text's title is mentioned, calculate on your own how much you must have read to follow the class discussion for that day.

SYLLABUS 

Aug. 26: Introduction: syllabus, library resources, research methods, study ethics, time management. Homework assignment; Tophat.com, etc.

Aug. 28: Historical and social-literary survey of the Middle Ages, read the article by Emily Amt/Classen (online). 

Consult also my own article (Classen) published in The Literary Encyclopedia (normally accessible only through subscription; but I have made it available for you free of charge). Here focus especially on the second part dealing with the end of the Middle Ages.

Sept. 04: Continue with Amt/Classen. You need to know the major stages in the history of the Middle Ages, the social structure, the major external threats, the history of the crusades (in very general terms), the concept of the court). Focus will be on the early and the high Middle Ages.

Time table

We also discuss the literary history of the Middle Ages, pp. 11-14 (Amt/Classen). I might ask you a question on Tophat about this section.

Sept. 09: We begin also with Gottfried von Strassburg, Tristan:  For a quick introduction, see this link. I do not require you to read this romance, though I strongly recommend to do so. The online link will give you a quick synopsis. You must familiarize yourself with the content of this romance at least through this source.

Sept. 11: Cont.: Tristan 

Sept. 16: Apollonius of Tyre

Sept. 18:  1st Exam, and last reflections on Apollonius

Sept. 23: we discuss: Hartmann von Aue: Lord Henry

Possible topics:

Love and Destiny in Apollonius

Language and Love: The Riddle as the Key to Happiness

Conflict Between Marital and Non-Marital Love (Tristan)

 

Sept. 25: 1st paper due today in class, either on Apollonius or on  Tristan. We continue with Hartmann von Aue; if time permits, we also begin with Marie de France, but postpone most of it to Mo. Anglo-Norman (British) Culture: Marie de France (Section 08): Prologue, and Guigemar

Sept. 30: Marie de France: Equitan and Eliduc

Oct. 07: Le Fresne and Laval

Oct. 09: Erotic Tales: Anonymous: The Little Bunny Rabbit

Oct. 14: Erotic TalesThe Monk with the Little Goose

Oct. 16: Walther von der Vogelweide (pp. 172-76), esp. "Under the Linden"

Oct. 21: Mauritius von Craun (Section 10)

Oct. 23: Mauritius von Craun   

Undergraduate Conference on Medieval Studies, at NAU: https://acmrs.org/studentconference 

Oct. 28: Mauritius von Craun; we also read Anonymous: "The Nightingale" (in: Erotic Tales)

Oct. 30: Aucassin and Nicolette (Section 14)

Nov. 04: 2nd paper is due in class. We read: Fabliaux (Section 9) 

Nov. 06: Carmina Burana (in the large textbook): "Omittamus Studia" (43-44), "Exiit Diluculo" (48), "Eia Dolor!" (58-62)

Nov. 13: Rewrite of 2nd paper is due in class. Carmina Burana, "Tempus transit gelidum" (63-64), "Virgo Quedam Nobilis" (64-65), "Ich Was Ein Chint so wolgetan" (65-67).

Your assignment in class will be to focus on one of the many poems in the Carmina Burana, and establish a solid interpretation, offering various perspectives as discussed in your group. NOTE: you need to do some research and identify one critical study on the Carmina Burana, whether it pertains to your song or not, and include that in your report. List the exact bibliographical information at the end of your report.

Questions: 1. Who is speaking? 2. What is the central motif? 3. What nature elements enter the picture and what is their value? 4. What references to classical antiquity to you observe (names, topics, objects)? 5. How does the poet formulate a central idea on love?  We will work on this both on Tue and Thu.

See, e.g.: rap performance of a song in the Carmina Burana by one of my former students, "Harley" (Dec. 2014)

In class, in groups, we'll discuss further examples from the CB

Nov. 20: Erotic Tales: Dietrich of the Gletze, The Belt

Nov. 25: Erotic Tales: Continue with Dietrich of the Gletze (or Glezze). 2nd paper will be returned, if possible

Nov. 27: no class (due to Thanksgiving)

Dec. 02: 3rd paper is due. Ruprecht von Würzburg, anonymous:Two Merchants; and Warm Donation. Today we also return to the overview of the Middle Ages, focusing on the late Middle Ages and the transition to the Renaissance

Dec. 04: Erotic Tales: The Hazelnut Mountain; Woman's Constancy; Aristotle and Phyllis

Dec. 04: Heinrich Kaufringer: "The Search" and "The Innocent Murderess"

Dec. 04: Extra credit work is due in class. Late submissions not accepted. If you want to earn extra credit (up to 30 points), please visit the UoA Museum of Art, go to the Retablo Room, examine the marvelous art work from 15th-c. Spain and write a short paper about it (ca. 500 words). 

Please do the Teaching Evaluation!

Dec. 09: Kaufringer, "The Innocent Murderess."

Dec. 04: Walther von der Vogelweide, "Under the Linden Tree" (164); and Der Wilde Alexander (177).

Dec. 11: 2nd exam (comprehensive)

Subsequently, final discussion, the meaning of courtly love, of eroticism and sexuality in human life.